808 – OneTechStop https://www.onetechstop.net Your Source For All Tech Mon, 30 Dec 2013 16:55:07 -0500 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 https://www.onetechstop.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cropped-onetechstop-1-1-32x32.png 808 – OneTechStop https://www.onetechstop.net 32 32 77705806 808 2 1020 https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/12/29/808-2-1020/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/12/29/808-2-1020/#comments Mon, 30 Dec 2013 02:56:14 +0000 http://www.nokiainnovation.com/?p=11728

Wonderful things, smartphones. Even better when they can do a lot more than other smartphones. In 2012, Nokia released the superbly capable 808 PureView, showing the world that you could take terrific photos and then zoom in to create more terrific photos. But the tech-media world collectively sagged as it sighed: urggh…it ran Symbian. Oh […]

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Wonderful things, smartphones. Even better when they can do a lot more than other smartphones. In 2012, Nokia released the superbly capable 808 PureView, showing the world that you could take terrific photos and then zoom in to create more terrific photos. But the tech-media world collectively sagged as it sighed: urggh…it ran Symbian. Oh God, no. Not that old, fusty, ancient OS from the N95 days! Forget it, not interested, supercamera or no supercamera. Actually, they were interested, but only when this imaging beastie gets slapped on a Windows Phone.

Of course those iPhone and SGS4 toting writers had immediately dismissed it without even giving Symbian Belle a chance, but, well, that can only be expected really.

My gorgeous RED 808
My gorgeous RED 808

Fast-forward to summer 2013 and there it was, the Nokia Lumia 1020, with the (almost) same 41MP sensor, but with the 920’s Optical Imaging Stabilisation and BackSide Illuminated sensor,  and combining Zeiss’s latest optics, meaning that the 1020 was like a fusion of the 808 and the 920. Photo Heaven.

lumia-1020-elop

But I shunned the yellow jacket Lumia, because my glorious and cheeky bright red 808 PureView already took incredible photos, right? And as for the OS part of the experience, Symbian Belle FP2 did just the job, singing along nicely when I needed to text, email, tweet, like, and even surf. Not that speed was of the essence, but that was ok, it was Symbian, and I knew it wasn’t going to be superfast, and what did I care for a few extra nanoseconds – this thing took amazing pictures!

And that it did. I took the 808 on my honeymoon and took a gazillion photos in glorious detail and colour, some of which I have had enlarged to poster size for our home. And when the juice started to run out, I could quickly switch the dying battery for a fresh one and power back on within 2 minutes – a very valuable option when out and about.

Hawaii on my 808 - amazing
Hawaii on my 808 – amazing

But fast forward again to November 2013 – just a mere 3 months later – and things are rather different. Under the looming shadow of Nokia being bought up by Microsoft, and with Nokia deciding to ditch everything Symbian and MeeGo from their rapidly descending hot air balloon (by effectively closing the Nokia Store), using a Symbian phone as your main device now seems to have a very faint whiff of death about it.

I took my trusty 808 on holiday again in November, over a 4 day jolly to Jamaica, thinking that, as in Hawaii, it would serve just fine as my main device. But I was actually wrong. Disappointingly, in the time since I was snapping beaches and palm trees in Kauai and Maui, Nokia seem to have ripped more wires out of the old junction box. My email was essentially dead; I could manually ask it to check my Gmail account, but it would not do a good job of that, informing me I had no new mail when I knew very well that I definitely had. It was just as badly behaved when trying to upload a photo to either Twitter or Facebook from the Gallery, I would find out later that the uploads had failed. Retrying didn’t give any joy, and I can only assume that Nokia has cut this particular cord with their Microsoft-branded wire clippers. Also on the Naughty List was the OS itself – for the first time ever since upgrading to Belle Delight, the phone froze, restarted, froze some more, then froze some more after that. I was utterly frustrated at the phone, the 808, the red beast that had brought so much joy to my life throughout 2013, letting me down when I really needed it. So for a little while, my attention left the 808 and fell to the 920, which (of course) didn’t let me down once.

Jamaica captured on my 808
Jamaica captured on my 808…when it worked!

So on my plane journey home I did some serious, deep, supergeek thinking. I decided that, yes, I wanted the best camera phone out there. While I was sure that the No.1 slot went to the 808 even during early December 2013, I knew the 1020 couldn’t be too far behind. I’d read enough comparisons and “vs” articles on the web to know that no matter what Sony, Samsung, LG, et al threw out of their factories, nothing could beat the 808 or the 1020. So could I do what I had been trying not to do since the summer announcement of the 1020?

Yes. I simply had to. And with my mind made up, I set about selling my beloved 808 to fund the cost of an unlocked 1020. I played with the idea of going back to the Devil and signing over my soul – in other words, signing a new AT&T 2-year contract – but I really just couldn’t. I had paid good money to break my contract with them 4 years ago, so to go back and willingly offer up my soul to them again seemed asinine. And it seemed that while it was expensive, the 1020 was within my grasp if I got a decent price for my 808. And I did.

So I went ahead and bid on a couple of yellow 1020s on eBay, without luck, and then took the plunge, spending a tiny bit more than planned and bought one without bidding. As luck would have it, this particular 1020 arrived in the AT&T retail box with all the trimmings, and at a great price too. Score!

Woohoo!
Woohoo!

As if Emperor Elop himself had heard that N9Andy had turned his back on his 808 and stepped over to the Dark Side, something rather awesome happened the same day my 1020 arrived via UPS. Nokia released Lumia Black to all AT&T branded 1020s! Woohoo! Thank you, Nokia! So not only am I getting to grips with the world’s best supercamera beauty, but I received what most WP8 device owners assume isn’t coming until February/March 2014. And the update allows messaging and call icons to be permanently seen on the lockscreen (just as with our beloved Symbian and N9 phones), you can quickly close open apps with a tap on the ‘X’ – very similar again to Symbian and MeeGo, as well as a whole list of things that make using a WP8 device just that little bit more enjoyable.

WP_20131226_035

So what do I think of the Lumia 1020? As a diehard Symbian and MeeGo fan, I have to say, I love this thing. It performs better than I expect it too. I liked my 920, but didn’t love it because the photos were just, well,  good. Now I have this ultra-speedy OS, with lots of whistles and bells from my Symbian/N9 days, all wrapped around the most amazing camera ever, even more so than the 808, and that is saying something! Why though? Well, the 1020 doesn’t make the 808 obsolete. But with the OIS and the BSI elements of this camera, the 1020 does what the 808 does but goes a step further in quality and flexibility. But mostly, when you couple this kind of camera power with the under-the-hood heft of WP8 with apps opening in no time at all, uploads to social websites a complete doddle, email, texting, tweeting, etc, etc… it is just a better experience overall.

WP_20131226_063

Everything that my 808 did can be done 1000 times quicker, and it’s done in a way that is way more enjoyable and immersive because WP8 isn’t sitting on a 640×360 screen, running on a single-core 1.3GHz CPU with 512MB of RAM. Not that I’m knocking the hardware specs of the 808, but they are very 2011/12, and as I hop-skip-jump towards the line that crosses over into 2014, I want not only the best camera in a phone, but a phone that can handle things like speedy web browsing, voice commands that won’t crash the app (yes, you Vlingo!), and apps that serve my daily needs properly, like a Chase banking app, Kindle, Hulu+, Netflix, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp, Angry Birds GO!, FourSquare, updated HERE Maps and Drive, and email that just works. My 808 could do some of those things, but even so, it couldn’t do them reliably anymore, or at best couldn’t do them quickly.

Using the app SoZoom, you can brag about your 1020's abilities!
Using the app SoZoom, you can brag about your 1020’s abilities!

So here I am, about to start a new year with a new phone. In 2010 it was with a new, shiny Nokia E7. In 2011 it was a brand new Nokia N9 that remained my best friend for a good 2 years. In early 2013 my heart was captured by the 808 PureView. And now, in the last breaths of 2013, my mobile phone passion has a new focus for 2014: the Nokia Lumia 1020. A yellow one. And I’m loving it.

Here are a few more 1020 samples: (click on them for crazy 1020-style detail!)

fr12_27_2013100212 WP_20131222_14_51_45_Pro WP_20131226_15_55_24_Pro__highres fr12_27_201394455 fr12_26_201344623

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‘Finnished’? https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/09/04/finnished/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/09/04/finnished/#comments Wed, 04 Sep 2013 22:45:22 +0000 http://www.nokiainnovation.com/?p=10479

How did you start your day, on September 3rd? Mine began as normally as any other, for the first ten minutes. I got out of bed, used the loo, fed the cats, switched on the TV and tuned into BBC World News. I have to do that here in the States as the word “news” […]

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How did you start your day, on September 3rd? Mine began as normally as any other, for the first ten minutes. I got out of bed, used the loo, fed the cats, switched on the TV and tuned into BBC World News. I have to do that here in the States as the word “news” on any other terrestrial TV channel seems to mean “entertainment and maybe some facts”.

 As my first spoonful of Cheerios made its way to my mouth, it suddenly made its way back down to the bowl. My mouth was still open though. It was open in shock, because I was staring wide-eyed at the TV screen, seeing the message “Microsoft buys Nokia” and hearing the beginning of the report being read by the newsman. Needless to say, fifteen minutes later my Cheerios were soggy and unappealing, left ignored as I scoured the web on my laptop for more information on what seemed to be almost impossible news.

But it wasn’t impossible news. This has been on the cards since February 11th 2011, when Steve Ballmer and Stephen Elop stood on a stage in front of a huge blue backdrop with the words “Nokia” and “Microsoft” telling the world that these two companies were now in bed together.

 Elop-Ballmer

And now, after a relatively short marriage, they have divorced. Except Microsoft got the car, the house and most of the kids.

 

The acquisition of Nokia’s devices & services division indeed spells the end for Nokia making phones. They had a good run, but any Nokia fan will tell you, the last few years have been a bit tough, and it started long before Mr. Elop showed up in September 2010 as the new CEO.

 

Nokia had a run of bad decisions, which I’m not going to go into detail here, but the inefficiency within the company was its ultimate downfall. The bickering between the Symbian and Maemo/MeeGo teams, the penny-pinching decisions to put measly hardware components in so-called flagship devices (think: N97) while Apple were throwing their new iPhone at anyone who could catch, and Android was a newly-rolled snowball, quickly gaining speed down the mountain, becoming bigger and more menacing as each quarter passed by. Before long Nokia, who were still not working quickly enough with their software innovation, fell behind.

Think about this: since the launch of Symbian^3 in September 2010, only one major US carrier stocked a Nokia phone running this OS which was T-Mobile with the C7 “Astound”. No N8s anywhere, no E7s. To Americans anyway, Nokia quickly became synonymous with the types of phones your parents had in the late 1990s – weighty grey bricks that could only play Snake. The two mega-giants, iPhones and Androids, rose up and towered over Nokia, and hardly anyone was interested in them anymore. Enter Stephen Elop, and February 11th 2011 was bound to happen.

 Since then Nokia have managed to win the hearts and minds back of many tech writers, bloggers, tech fans and even iPhone and Android users. The Nokia Lumia range of smartphones is now an admirable line-up, from superb cheaper options like the Lumia 620, to the stunningly attractive 925, to the outstanding 1020 with its PureView 41MP camera sensor. Windows Phone 8 still has some holes to fill, but overall it is an appealing and easy to use OS. And let’s not forget the head-turning Nokia 808 PureView from last year, and the innovative design language and UI of the Nokia N9 in 2011. Windows Phone has come along nicely, and today, it’s a very pleasant experience.

For me, that doesn’t change now that Nokia has sold itself off to Microsoft. My Lumia 920 is still a Nokia Lumia 920, and it was designed and built by Nokia employees at a Nokia facility. It contains Nokia created apps such as HERE Maps and HERE Drive, and it even has the classic Nokia ringtone for crying out loud! It is a Nokia phone, which is why I enjoy using it. It may not be as “Nokia-y” as my 808 PureView or my N9, but it has enough pure Nokia craftsmanship to make me have an emotional attachment to it.

2013-09-04-1282

But now things have changed. While it is very possible that Nokia will still be a visible name on the next couple of Lumia releases, it is inevitable that Microsoft will remove the Nokia brand and replace it with their own. Perhaps we will see the “Surface 1620” next year, if not the “Microsoft Lumia 1620”. Either way, it won’t say “Nokia” on the box anywhere, even if ex-employees of the Finnish company are the ones who sat at the drawing board and designed the thing.

 My personal thoughts on all this are twofold: practical and emotional. Firstly, it makes good sense for Microsoft from a business viewpoint to allocate enormous funds to acquire such a superb hardware department it can call its own. I get that, and I’m kind of happy they chose Nokia over, say HTC, because you know they’ve chosen well. I’m also happy that Nokia are not completely dead; Nokia will remain Nokia the company, it’ll just be a much smaller tech entity, specialising in HERE mapping solutions, networks, and other “advanced” technologies that will benefit the greater mobile device landscape in years to come. They still remain “Nokia” as a company, and the CTO office stays unchanged. They also, and most importantly I think, keep control of their patents, which might be worth something to them as a company in the future. As I understand it, Nokia cannot use the name “Nokia” on any mobile phone product for the next 30 months, so one can speculate that after that time, and with that pile of patents locked up in the Nokia vault, it’s conceivable that a Nokia smartphone is an possibility in 2016. Right?

I can’t ignore the other massive elephant in my room: Jolla. Ex-Nokians who designed the MeeGo-powered Nokia N9 who left to start their own smartphone company, and who have scheduled a release of their first Jolla phone for the end of this year, have been drumming up excitement all throughout 2013, and I for one am excited. Yes there’s the Nokia connection, but after watching the Jolla demos, I’m genuinely intrigued and fired-up by the Sailfish OS and interface. I was an early-adopter and put my 100€ deposit down the day they announced that pre-order program, so I’m already personally invested in that new company to some extent, and I continue to follow their progress on Twitter and their website. If Nokia and Microsoft hadn’t happened yesterday, I would still be looking forward to my Jolla phone.

The news on the 3rd was a shock and I was initially saddened by it. Throughout the day I could not shake off the depressing thought of not seeing another Nokia phone being released ever again. I also couldn’t help thinking that the end of Nokia as a device producer means that there’ll be no more Nokia accessories. I’ll miss the other stuff too: their websites, videos, launches, demos, parties (!) and one can’t help but think about all the thousands of Nokia employees who will be transferred to Microsoft and all that entails. I wish them the best of luck and hope that no one actually loses their job because of this.

 

2013-09-04-1283

For me right now, I’ll continue to thoroughly enjoy my Nokia phones, which I am now more glad than ever to own. My 808 PureView has given me so much pleasure with its camera, and it will continue to do so for years to come. My E7 with its superb sliding qwerty keyboard and my E6 with its fixed qwerty keyboard are both distinctive and fine pieces of kit, different in their own way, but excellent at what they are able to do. My N900 will always be the one that turned me into a phone geek, with the never ending possibilities that Maemo allows even today, and that qwerty is still my favourite keyboard to date. My N9 holds a special place in my heart as the MeeGo-Harmattan interface kept me away from almost everything else for over a year, and it’s still an exceptional, beautiful device.

 2013-09-04-1280

Most recently I acquired a Nokia Lumia 920, the cyan version. To me the physical design is so reminiscent of my N9, it’s almost like having a bigger N9! But the WP8 interface has many advantages over the aging MeeGo (and Symbian) and I’m enjoying the easy to use apps and the sheer speed and fluidity of the 920, it’s hard to put it down. And it clearly says “NOKIA” in the upper-right corner.

 2013-09-04-1290

Will it be my last Nokia purchase? Most likely. I understand the reasons behind the surprising news but I am not inclined to enjoy what will be coming down the line in the near future. My emotional attachment to Nokia (as I mentioned in my last post about reaching the OS crossroads) is strong, and it’s the main reason I’ve shunned iPhones and Samsungs and HTCs the past few years. I know Nokia are still around and will be around as a Finnish company doing their good works. But are they ‘Finnished’? Not really, but as far as phones go, unfortunately, yes. If Jolla is where true Nokia talent is going to be, then that’s where I’ll head next.

 

And if Nokia want to join forces with Jolla in 2016…I’ll be even happier.

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Approaching the OS crossroads? https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/08/28/approaching-os-crossroads/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/08/28/approaching-os-crossroads/#comments Wed, 28 Aug 2013 11:05:14 +0000 http://www.nokiainnovation.com/?p=10355

I used to write for EverythingN9.com before Lenny at Nokia Innovation tapped me on the shoulder and asked me to write for this site. I was a huge Nokia N9 fan, and in many ways I still am, but time changes things, and it moves us on. Whether or not we want to stick with […]

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I used to write for EverythingN9.com before Lenny at Nokia Innovation tapped me on the shoulder and asked me to write for this site. I was a huge Nokia N9 fan, and in many ways I still am, but time changes things, and it moves us on. Whether or not we want to stick with the device and operating system we loved years ago is a matter of personal preference, and I am very firmly of the belief that if someone likes something for whatever reason, then that is their free and fair choice to make.

I recently read a rather excellent piece on EverythingN9 by one of the newer writers, Antoine. His piece described how he feels right now about the N9, how it stands as a marker in the timeline to where Nokia had developed a superb design language and where the company could have gone if Symbian had failed them and there wasn’t another option out there. Of course we now know there was another, far more appealing option to the CEO and the Board in the form of Windows Phone. But the N9 was still released despite this strategy change, and a year later, the Nokia 808 PureView was released running not Windows Phone but Symbian, the very OS that was alluded to as the ‘burning platform’.

 Some people will baulk at the mere mention of Windows Phone. Not me. As someone who has thoroughly enjoyed the Symbian journey, loved the MeeGo pitstop, and who is now dipping his toe in the Windows Phone adventure, I feel that I am starting to make the transition.

Heresy! I hear you cry. I’ve just read your latest post on the 808 you utter hypocrite! How very dare you, sir!!

Ok. Let’s take a deep breath for a second. I am not, for one micron, suggesting that MeeGo and Symbian (despite what the blogosphere and TwitterLand tell you) are dead, useless, ancient and need to be consigned to the WebOS land of OS ghosts without a second’s hesitation. Both Symbian and MeeGo have many favourable points, and of course, as in the 808’s case, have some extremely good and noteworthy hardware points. But as September 2013 quickly approaches, these two old fellas might tell a great story and know how to make the perfect omelette, but when it comes to more of this modern magickytrickery, they aren’t a great deal of help.

 

Allow me to explain.

 I have had, for quite a while now, a Lumia 810 on loan from the nice chaps at Nokia Innovation, via Nokia USA and T-Mobile. I recently purchased a Nokia Lumia 521 for myself, so that I still have a WP8 toy around when the 810 has to go back. What I’ve found in this time is that there is something very attractive about a very modern OS with some welly behind it (think iOS7 or Android JellyBean if you like). People are not running out to buy Symbian phones right now. Even if Nokia released a new Symbian device, hardly anyone would buy it. Why? Put simply, to the eyes of the average punter (basically everyone not reading blog sites like this!) the iOS/Android flavoured OS looks way more sexy and sleek on screen than Belle FP2. The higher screen resolution alone will sway them the Apple way. A good looking, flashy and swish OS is very nice to look at, even if under-the-hood it’s lacking a few important useful bits.

 

How about this analogy: (humour me for a moment, if you will) – Symbian is like a steady wife; she’s always there for you, gives you awesome advice, stands by your side, and makes a mean shepherd’s pie every Thursday night like no one else. But then (for whatever reason) you split up, and in time you move on. Somehow you end up with a gorgeous, much younger woman who just happens to like older men. Take a look in any gossip magazine next time you visit the dentist – it happens.

Symbian is the wife, but iOS, Android and Windows Phone are the lovely young lady. She’s got all the good looks and knows all about current pop culture and can rock on the dancefloor until 3am, but ask her about that shepherd’s pie and she’ll be reaching for the Bird’s Eye version in the freezer.

 Andy, what the hell are you on about? Well all I’m saying (through a totally bizarre analogy!) is that Windows Phone is amazing, it’s fast and it’s sleek, but there are still things that I miss from the old faithfuls, Symbian and MeeGo that may or not may not come with future iterations of the Microsoft platform. For example, it does seem a teeny weeny bit silly that equalizer settings are not available within the music player app, but rather via the corridors and cubicles of Settings. Hmm. And within the camera UI (Lumia 1020 aside here I think) choosing different modes or trying to change various settings seems way too arduous. Some simple permanent onscreen menu buttons and/or dials would alleviate too many screen taps for my liking. Another minor gripe: I like to know if people have received text messages I send (maybe their phones are turned off?) and with Symbian and MeeGo, a simple, quick pop-up message appears for a short moment to let me know my sms has been received. I’ve had and enjoyed this feature for a long, long time. In Windows Phone? Hmm. A completely new and entire text message is received to let me know, simply, that my sms reached its destination. How very 1998.

Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t a Windows Phone bash fest. I’m just trying to describe how someone who is a staunch Symbian and MeeGo supporter could even begin to enjoy – and perhaps even step over to – Windows Phone. And if someone is willing to be that open and all-embracing, then why not Android, an OS that is surely more closely aligned to Symbian than Windows Phone?

 

Well here is the other, very important factor: Nokia, Nokia, Nokia. The Finnish company have produced very reliable and sublimely-designed devices over the years, and in the likes of the Lumias 920, 925 and 1020, that particular strength clearly isn’t fading. But what else draws someone looking for pastures new back to Nokia? The community. Connecting People? You bet. Ever since signing up to the Nokia Discussions pages and delving into some truly friendly discussions with some truly friendly people, I’ve not only been hooked on Nokia’s hardware, but its users. Sounds strange I know, but one thing Nokia fans seem to have in common is that they’re all jolly nice folk. Guys who will engage in friendly banter on Twitter or Nokia Discussions, techies who will offer fantastic advice and know-how, and actual Nokia employees who will offer their point of view as well. And actually meeting these people face-to-face simply confirms what you knew already; they really are jolly nice folks! And I think that, coupled with a love for a brand I’ve been attached to since my very first mobile device (a Nokia 101 in 1993, although it was only loaned to me. My first true Nokia purchase was the much better looking 232).

And with that, it would seem only natural that if their other OSes of the past start to creak and wane, then their current one could offer the Nokia enthusiast a very natural step. And with updates coming all the time, no one can argue that WP8 is stuck and is in threat from office politics and cost-cutting. It’s on the update super-highway, financed by the millions of dollars from both Microsoft and Nokia, so one doesn’t have to worry about having to wait 12 months for an OS update (think Symbian Anna?)

 And what is so wrong about enjoying all three OSes, plugging into them when needed and enjoying what they all individually give? Nothing as far as I’m concerned. Keeping an open mind has led me to enjoying what WP8 has to offer, and has some really beautiful apps that are not only easy to use but are actually more rewarding to use on WP8 than on Symbian and/or MeeGo. Need an example? Facebook, and that’s enough really. Both the Symbian and MeeGo efforts are awful (to put it nicely), and for such a high-profile app too it is (and always was to be honest) pretty unacceptable. The WP8 version however is a dream to use.

Then again, I’m drawn back to the N9 and its swipey interface in MeeGo Harmattan. We’ve only really seen this kind of UI in the recent Asha 501, but I’m not about to start adding S40 sprinkles to the pot here.

 

WP8 does have a tiny bit of swiping going on, with a swipe to the left to reveal the ‘app drawer’, and now, with ‘Amber’ we can swipe [only] up to unlock, after double-tapping the phone from the standby screen to reveal the lockscreen. As you probably know, the ‘double-tap-wake’ feature was first seen on the Nokia N9.

When it comes to a possible move over to WP8 there are, of course, the motivating factors of being much more contemporary as well as receiving new, fresh apps. Take ‘Redbox’ for example. In the WP8 app I can reserve and pay for a DVD before I get to the shop, and before anyone else can get their grubby hands on it. With my 808 or my N9? No such app, never will be one, so… and you can name more than a handful of truly useful apps that are available on iOS, Android and WP8 but have never and will never be created or ported for Symbian and MeeGo. Which, yes, is a shame, but a reality.

Multitasking anyone? You only have to read a few items on the web comparing Symbian, MeeGo and Windows Phone to realise that, while WP8 does allow you to retrace your steps as it were, we still don’t have the kind of versatile multitasking that we’ve come to appreciate, especially with the N9 because of the way it’s so brilliantly implemented and laid out for us.

So, approaching the crossroads? Coming up to decision time? Possibly, although 2-year contracts and carrier exclusivity really put me off, so no Lumia 1020 for me. Yet.

Incidentally, while I’m approaching the crossroads I’ll no doubt be knocked over by a truck, making me drop all of my phones in the street.

 

The truck might have ‘Jolla’ written on the side. 😉

 

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qooSaver: a MeeGo-like standby screen for Symbian https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/07/10/qoosaver-brings-meego-like-standby-screen-to-symbian/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/07/10/qoosaver-brings-meego-like-standby-screen-to-symbian/#respond Wed, 10 Jul 2013 18:06:46 +0000 http://www.nokiainnovation.com/?p=9217

  Steve over at AllAboutSymbian just reported on an absolutely brilliant new app by the guys over at qooApps, called qooSaver. This is an alternative to the standard Symbian “Big Clock” screensaver, and even trumps the more popular “Nokia Sleeping Screen” in my view, which after years of use seems a little dated to me now. Symbian […]

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qooSaver
qooSaver is now available in the Store

 

Steve over at AllAboutSymbian just reported on an absolutely brilliant new app by the guys over at qooApps, called qooSaver. This is an alternative to the standard Symbian “Big Clock” screensaver, and even trumps the more popular “Nokia Sleeping Screen” in my view, which after years of use seems a little dated to me now.

Symbian owners have enjoyed this always-on clock arrangement for years, and MeeGo developer Thomas Pearl managed to squeeze more onto the Nokia N9’s screen via the excellent Billboard Standby Screen app. Even now, Nokia is spreading the wealth by integrating an always-on clock into their upcoming ‘Amber’ update for the Lumia line.

 

screen
My 808’s ‘sleeping’ screen. I like cyan for my font colour!

 

The app is just $0.99 and is great value for money. It shows all of the important info you need to glance at without having to unlock your phone. Going a few steps further than Nokia Sleeping Screen, qooSaver displays the weather, the current connectivity and battery life, along with a user-defined message, if you wanted to add that on too.

But the best thing about this app is how you can customize it to fit your needs; if you don’t want the weather to show, if you want the text in white or red, or in bold font, or tiny or huge – all of these settings are available to you. It’s all very simple, with the option to preview what it is going to look like before setting it in stone; this app is excellently made and looks great on my 808’s screen.

 

screen2
Plenty of settings here

 

notifications
Missed call and text notifications show up as these icons

 

As Steve says in his full-review, don’t walk, run to the Nokia Store and get this on your Symbian Belle device!

🙂

 

 

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Nokia 808 PureView Vs Samsung Galaxy Zoom https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/06/14/noklia-808-vs-samsung-galaxy-zoom/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/06/14/noklia-808-vs-samsung-galaxy-zoom/#comments Fri, 14 Jun 2013 18:17:39 +0000 http://nokiainnovation.com/?p=8952

  WMPowerUser.com reports that Hi-tech.mail.ru  has done a comparison of the camera’s on the reigning Smartphone camera King, The Nokia 808 PureView and the pretender (in every sense of the word) Samsung Galaxy Zoom. You can read their post here.   From the pictures on WMpoweruser I would say the 808 still rules supreme with its 41MP […]

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zoom808

 

WMPowerUser.com reports that Hi-tech.mail.ru  has done a comparison of the camera’s on the reigning Smartphone camera King, The Nokia 808 PureView and the pretender (in every sense of the word) Samsung Galaxy Zoom. You can read their post here.

 

zoom808and

From the pictures on WMpoweruser I would say the 808 still rules supreme with its 41MP camera against the Zoom’s 16MP. I read an interesting post on MyNokiaBlog “Less Than Meets The Eye” which goes into detail about the sensor size (more important than Mega Pixels), which points out the 808 has a sensor of 1/1.2″ compared to the Zoom which has 1/2.3″ (same as Nokia’s N86 apparently). FYI- In this case a lower number is better.

WMPowerUser brings up the fact that the 808 should have the same unit as the yet-to-be-announced Nokia EOS, saying;

“The EOS is expected to use the same camera assembly as the Nokia 808 Pureview from last year, so comparing photos taken with the 808 to the Zoom should give an idea of what buyers can expect in the next few months”

While that is true, I still have some questions about how the Windows Phone platform will handle a camera of that quality. Nokia have obviously been working hard to get it right, and soon we will see the results for ourselves, hopefully with OIS in the mix as well.

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Nokia To Bring Smartphone Cameras With “Hundreds of millions of pixels” https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/05/21/nokia-to-bring-smartphone-cameras-with-hundreds-of-millions-of-pixels/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/05/21/nokia-to-bring-smartphone-cameras-with-hundreds-of-millions-of-pixels/#respond Tue, 21 May 2013 20:57:16 +0000 http://www.nokiainnovation.com/?p=8775 Nokia could soon be selling smartphones with cameras capable of capturing pictures with a resolution which is “better than the human eye” An interesting article on Nokia Conversations talks about the work NGP (Nokia People Growth) is doing. NGP since 2006 have been finding Ecosystem Partners who they invest in, such as Pelican Imaging whose […]

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Nokia could soon be selling smartphones with cameras capable of capturing pictures with a resolution which is “better than the human eye”
An interesting article on Nokia Conversations talks about the work NGP (Nokia People Growth) is doing.
NGP since 2006 have been finding Ecosystem Partners who they invest in, such as Pelican Imaging whose Array Camera technology we covered in April (read it here) and InVisage, who, according to the article are “developing new image sensing technology that has the potential to deliver smartphone image sensors that boast a resolution of hundreds of millions of pixels – better than the human eye. It means that photographs could be sharper, clearer and better than ever before”.
Nokia aren’t alone in bringing Smartphones to market with cutting edge camera technology, but they are arguably at the top of the game. And, judging by the investments NGP are making, should continue to lead the way.

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Impressive 808 PureView night shot https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/05/10/impressive-808-pureview-night-shot/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/05/10/impressive-808-pureview-night-shot/#comments Sat, 11 May 2013 01:17:31 +0000 http://nokiainnovation.com/?p=8629

OK, so I know that everyone talks about the Lumia 920 (and now the 928) and how amazing it is at taking low-light shots. And it is. Lenny showed me some pretty spectacular shots he took with his 920 after a Nokia event on the streets of New York at night and I was extremely […]

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OK, so I know that everyone talks about the Lumia 920 (and now the 928) and how amazing it is at taking low-light shots. And it is. Lenny showed me some pretty spectacular shots he took with his 920 after a Nokia event on the streets of New York at night and I was extremely impressed with them.

 

But the 808 PureView is also very good at taking low-light shots, with a bit more work from the user. That is, amazing night shots won’t often be captured in Auto mode, but with a tinker here and a tweak there, incredible night time shots can be achieved.

 

Actually, you can turn night into day, as I just demonstrated to myself!

 

Here is a shot of the view from my building’s roof, with the 808 PureView set up in Night mode from the Scenes menu. Nothing much for the user to do here, it’s all set up for you:

 

 

And here is the exact same shot, taken a minute later, in Creative Full Resolution 38MP mode. The ISO was cranked way up to 1600, and the Neutral Density (ND) filter was turned on.

 

 

I was speechless! (a first for me) I managed to turn night into day!

 

I wish I had a proper tripod to really go to town with this. I was carefully balancing the 808 on the top of the roof’s fence, and because of the very long exposure time, there was no way I could hold the device completely still for long enough to get a sharper photo. So I might be getting myself on eBay later this evening for some tripod shopping…

 

Yes, please applaud the latest Lumia, and the current flagship, both amazing phones with great quality PureView 2 imaging technology.

 

Just don’t forget about PureView Pro just yet. It’s still absolutely amazing and incredibly versatile, even for novices like me. And I’m not posting this to show off a great photo; it’s clearly not that great in terms of quality. But it does demonstrate just how ridiculously good the 808’s camera is and what is possible with it, if you put your creative hat on.

 

Maybe next week’s Nokia announcement in London will reveal a device that can truly rival the 808 PureView’s camera punching power. Maybe.

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Symbian is dead. OH DO SHUT UP!! https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/03/12/symbian-is-dead-oh-do-shut-up/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/03/12/symbian-is-dead-oh-do-shut-up/#respond Tue, 12 Mar 2013 18:00:38 +0000 http://nokiainnovation.com/?p=7933

  I am a proud owner of a red Nokia 808 PureView, so I knew what I was getting into. The last Symbian phone? Sure, I knew that the day it was announced at MWC last year. But that didn’t stop me splashing out a million dollars to buy one. Actually, the red one was […]

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I am a proud owner of a red Nokia 808 PureView, so I knew what I was getting into. The last Symbian phone? Sure, I knew that the day it was announced at MWC last year. But that didn’t stop me splashing out a million dollars to buy one. Actually, the red one was quite hard to procure, but my persistence won in the end!

 

My sassy red 808 :)
My sassy red 808 🙂

 

Since then, the 808 PureView (and some of its Belle FP1 and FP2 cohorts) have had some updates thrown their way, even though people imagine the Symbian Department at Nokia to have been converted into Stephen Elop’s XBOX gaming and chilling lounge. Well, even if you don’t think that the department is now full of colourful couches, (with the Symbian logo on the wall being used as an ad-hoc dartboard for Elop’s executives) it still is a little surprising (but hugely heartwarming) to see updates still rolling out of the mill.

Recently we had an update that wasn’t all that grandiose, but was still vital for us power-users. It allowed photos to be shared directly from the Gallery to Twitter, something most phone geeks will cry loudly as a feature that should’ve been there in the first place. Nevertheless, it was a very welcome addition to the Facebook and Flickr options that came with FP2. All tweets sent this way show the client as ‘Nokia Share’. Personally I would like it to include ‘on the 808 PureView’ so I can show off my beloved – and expensive – purchase to the Twittersphere.

 

Updates keep a-comin'!
Updates keep a-comin’!

 

More recently, another Gallery and Camera tweak was announced: another (ahem) previously seen feature from Symbian phones of old, this update allows multiple sharing of photos. This means that you can now share more than one photo at a time to Twitter, or via Bluetooth or Email, whereas before, the only thing you could do with more than one photo at a time was delete them. This is hugely welcome for someone like me; I will take a bunch of photos, go to save them on my computer and then have to… reach for the USB lead and do it that way. Now I can select the five shots of the Empire State Building and effortlessly transfer them to my laptop via the magic of Bluetooth. Sweet!

Even more recently (today in fact!) we have heard that Nokia have pushed out another (yes, another!) update called ‘Telephony Update’ as imparted by the wonderful Steve Litchfield over at All About Symbian. There he tells us that it brings ‘quality improvements for telephony services’. I had read that some owners had suffered from problems with their 808 PureViews dropping the 3.5G connection (luckily mine doesn’t appear to be one of those) and perhaps it improves call quality too? Not that anyone has complained about call quality as far as I know, but one can speculate I suppose.

 

Great stuff - more please!
Great stuff – more please!

 

My only problem with my 808 PureView is a persistent WiFi problem, whereby after connecting manually to my home router (an Apple Airport Express) it will drop the connection after not being used for a little while and switch to 2G/3G. Luckily I have unlimited data on my mobile plan, but it is annoying all the same. My N9 (and all my other phones) don’t have any problems with WiFi. In fact, my N9 will happily and fully automatically switch from 3G to my WiFi as soon as it senses my WiFi is close by. I am hopeful that Nokia will release another WiFi patch for the 808 PureView to finally fix this little smudge on its otherwise beautiful face.

Thanks then to Nokia (and Accenture?) who still keep the Symbian engine chugging away, and giving us 808 PureView owners even more to be proud of. Cheers! 🙂

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3 weeks with the Nokia 808 PureView https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/02/21/3-weeks-with-the-nokia-808-pureview/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2013/02/21/3-weeks-with-the-nokia-808-pureview/#comments Thu, 21 Feb 2013 11:30:57 +0000 http://nokiainnovation.com/?p=7567

  It’s been almost three weeks since I first unboxed my brand new red Nokia 808 PureView, and I have really grown to love this unique device. It has surprised me in some ways; I was not really expecting to be able to use it as my daily phone, mainly because my Nokia N9 has […]

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It’s been almost three weeks since I first unboxed my brand new red Nokia 808 PureView, and I have really grown to love this unique device. It has surprised me in some ways; I was not really expecting to be able to use it as my daily phone, mainly because my Nokia N9 has taken the #1 spot for the past year, and its Swipe UI is very hard to beat.

The Nokia 808 PureView runs Symbian Belle FP2, which has been totally slated in most of the phone’s reviews, and while I am aware that these reviews were written by iPhone and/or Android users (let’s face it, the desk of those reviewers had an iPhone 5 or an SGS III sitting next to the keyboard!), I too was a little wary.

My experience with Symbian in its latest S^3 form dates back to the N8, which I purchased as soon as it was available on Amazon in the US. Since then, I’ve bought (and sold, and then re-bought!) the E7, E6 and C7. I wouldn’t have purchased these phones if I hated Symbian, so I do like it. But buying such an expensive unit as the 808… well, I was excited by the camera, but not that excited about diving back into Symbian again to be honest. It’s been a full two years since I first had the N8, and even though I still have it, the OS is sluggish by today’s standards, the system chugs along ok, but it’s no N9, no SGS III, no iPhone.

But…

The more positive reviewers, trusted guys such as Steve Litchfield and Stephen Quin, were saying that with the better internal hardware, and the right tweaks to Belle in FP2, it was lightyears away from S^3 in its first release.

So I had faith. Faith in those who had actually used the 808 for a decent amount of time, and who had really put it through its paces, and my trust in those people who were saying, “Go for it!” paid off.

 

Putting it to good use!
Putting it to good use!

 

Yes, the Nokia 808 PureView is a dream of a phone, and to me, I find it hard every day to decide whether it’s the N9 or the 808 for my daily usage. I’m changing my sim card a few times every few days, but to be honest, it has been sat inside my 808 for the majority of the time since it arrived.

While I have come across some oddities, it has been very smooth sailing. There have been some random (but now explainable) reboots, some apps don’t like each other and squabble (namely Font Zoomer and Opera browsers, which is a shame) and the battery life seems to be awesome until I get down to around 20% and then it dives to 3% in just a couple of hours, even though it took all day from 6am to 6pm to go from 100% to 20%, so that battery metering might be a bit wonky. Probably is on all phones though I bet.

But the camera is the one feature that makes me proud to carry this thing around in my pocket ecvery day. It doesn’t matter anymore if I think something is worth taking a photo of or not. With 16GB of onboard storage and a further 16GB microSD card, I feel like taking photos of everything I see! And the best thing is, I just know the photos will come out really, really well. I’ve been out and about, taking some snaps, uploading them to Twitter and Facebook, and it’s all been very easy to do. Big thanks to Nokia for recently pushing out a further update to the Gallery, so now sharing to Twitter is easy peasy and you don’t have to do it via the Twitter app of your choice (I use Tweetian).

So, I will let you know how it goes as the weeks fly by. I will continue to enjoy uploading my shots to Twitter and Flickr, and I hope you enjoy my ride with me. I used to feel like a stowaway as I trawled through PureViewClub.com pages, reading all the articles, following the 808 users on Twitter, and all the while feeling like I was missing out on something truly amazing.

And I now think that the Nokia 808 is truly amazing. The photos say it all.

Feel free to see these pics and more at Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andyhagon/sets/72157632802524292/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andyhagon/sets/72157632729782422/

Cheers! 🙂

Brooklyn wall art
Brooklyn wall art

 

Brooklyn Bridge view
Brooklyn Bridge view

 

Brooklyn Bridge
Brooklyn Bridge

 

Brooklyn Bridge
Brooklyn Bridge

 

City Hall
City Hall

 

Snow macro
Snow macro

 

The Hudson River
The Hudson River

 

Winter Wonderland
Winter Wonderland

 

Snowy trees
Snowy trees

 

Snowy branches
Snowy branches

 

Sledding fun
Sledding fun

 

Guacamole and cocktails!
Guacamole and cocktails!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nokia 808 PureView via Nokia Connects https://www.onetechstop.net/2012/08/15/808pv/ https://www.onetechstop.net/2012/08/15/808pv/#comments Thu, 16 Aug 2012 03:36:17 +0000 http://nokiainnovation.com/?p=5705 Nokia Connects picked up on my subtle request about  getting a trial Nokia 808 PureView for Nokia Innovation and Katie has sent us ones.  I will be reviewing the device for the first part and Lenny will have it for the 2nd part of a 3 week trial.  The 808 PureView is a Symbian device […]

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Nokia Connects picked up on my subtle request about  getting a trial Nokia 808 PureView for Nokia Innovation and Katie has sent us ones.  I will be reviewing the device for the first part and Lenny will have it for the 2nd part of a 3 week trial.  The 808 PureView is a Symbian device with incredible optics (41 MP), Xenon flash, NFC and a large 4′ screen.  It comes in three colors: black, white, red and it’s even released in the US after winning awards at the MWC in Barcelona earlier this year.  The suggested retail price is US $699 but prices have come down drastically, you can get the white version w/ US warranty for $619.99 (11% discount). 

In preparation for it’s arrival (don’t understand why  it takes DHL 2 days to come to NJ and only 1 day to NY), I have compiled a list of apps that I am installing after I have setup the device:

Swype I believe this is a must have if you can’t stand the Symbian S^3 keyboard.

Tweetian Have not used this twitter client, but will definitely give it a try. I want to see if I would revert back to Gravity, the first app I installed on my N8.

Nokia Pulse (beta) I am a big fan of this app and have been using it since it was announced at Nokia World last year.  Nokia Pulse is still in beta and can be downloaded from Betalabs.

I recently purchased a 64 GB micro SD and will check if I will be able to use it on the Nokia 808 PureView.

I will upload the pics to the NokiaInnovation Flickr page and will definitely not try to bore you with pictures of plants, flowers and buildings only :P.  Click on this link to view pictures on Flickr taken with a Nokia 808 PureView.

Please let me know if there’s anything else I should test or install on the Nokia 808 PureView.  You can leave a comment below or send me a tweet.  Once again, big thank you to Katie, and the rest of the Nokia Connects team for sending Nokia Innovation the 808 PureView.

 

 

 

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