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808 PureView: red to white and back to red

My first 808 PureView
My first 808 PureView

 

After foolishly selling my red Nokia 808 PureView, I have always considered buying another one to replace it. The 808 is one of those classic phones that, once you’ve used one with its exceptional camera, you sort of always want to have it close by in case the urge presents itself. After selling mine, the urge was quite prevalent, especially after perusing various 808 Flickr pages and seeing outstanding photos taken with the device, together with an occasional dip into All About Symbian to see what was going on while I was “sans Symbian”, reading about how people were still managing very well with their 808s even into 2015.

Unfortunately, it seemed that anyone with an 808 and who was willing to sell it on eBay was asking for around the reasonable $250 mark; these offerings, however, were only the white or the black versions. I did see a few red ones on there but the price was the same as I had paid in 2012: $500! So I had to pick between white or black, and after taking the plunge one evening while browsing through eBay, a very pristine Nokia 808 PureView arrived in my hands, in lovely pure white. It’s a very attractive device in white, but I still hankered after my bold and brassy red one from before.

 

Came with free Torx screwdrivers
Came with free Torx screwdrivers

 

So after flashing Delight 1.4 onto it and testing out the amazing camera again, I was enjoying it all over again… but it was… white. I wanted a red one! My good friend and fellow phone-enthusiast, Richard Yates, pointed me in the direction of some eBay sellers in China who were selling genuine Nokia materials, namely, an 808 PureView frame chassis in bright bold glorious red! So for about $45 I had coming to me from China the genuine article, except, of course, I was going to have to replace the chassis myself, and that was something that made me a little anxious to say the least! However, thanks to the wonderful videos of Le55ons on YouTube, (first brought to my attention by Steve Litchfield on both the Phones Show Chat and on the sites AllAboutSymbian and AllAboutWindowsPhone) it was actually extremely easy. I followed Richard’s advice and watched the Le55ons video a few times before attempting to do anything, and I kept it on close by while I did the ‘surgery’!

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First job was to simply remove the screws around the outside edge of the device, and then the screws toward the centre which were different types of screws, so it was important not to get the two types mixed up. Then it was just a matter of lifting away the outer casing to reveal the ‘guts’ of the phone (the screen plus the internals).

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The thing with replacement shells is that they are almost ready to switch over straightaway, except that not all of the components are included. However, this is obvious once you realise how easy it is to just pry out the various important components like the xenon flash, the 3G/4G antenna, etc., and then all that’s required is to clip or snap them back into their corresponding bays in the new chassis. It might seem daunting, but with a little care and not too much pressure, the things required do come out and away quite easily. Of course, everything is helped along by the soothing voice of Le55ons whose instructions are crystal clear both audibly and visually, so there isn’t a lot of room to make mistakes. Interestingly, the speaker component (just as easily plucked out as shown in the video tutorial) was included in my red chassis, so I’m not too sure why that is the case (excuse the awful pun) but it made things a tad quicker if anything.

That famous xenon flash!
That famous xenon flash!

 

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Once everything was back in place in its new scarlet home (antenna, xenon flash, headphone jack) it was just a matter of replacing the screws. I started as I finished, with the centre screws first, and then the four outside ones, being careful not to pick up the wrong type!

Everything back in its place
Everything back in its place

 

3G/4G antenna back in place at the bottom
3G/4G antenna back in place at the bottom
Carefully screw the screws back in
Carefully screw the screws back in

 

After that, I replaced the micro SDcard and battery and switched it on. Hey presto! A fully functioning, RED Nokia 808 PureView!

 

As if I never sold it!
As if I never sold it!

 

Of course I had to test it all out first, obviously including the camera (this was the first thing I tested!)

Great stuff
Great stuff

 

But of course, to really test the xenon flash, one has to make it capture a moving arm, preferably with an unopened beer bottle in hand! ;^)

 

A la Steve Litchfield! :^)
A la Steve Litchfield! :^)

 

And naturally, the 808’s xenon does a fantastic job of capturing my moving arm, almost as if it was static (it wasn’t!)

So there you have it, folks. From white to red in under 20 minutes. And now I’ll be even more proud to sport the now red 41MP PureView Symbian beast out and about in New York.

 

 

Brooklyn Bridge - 808 PureView
Brooklyn Bridge – 808 PureView

 

From white to red :^)
From white to red :^)
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